Walt Had a Vision: How to Market Like Disney

Walt Had a Vision: How to Market Like Disney

Jarrod Upton, chief operations and senior consultant with Herbers & Company, sounds like a square guy – we mean that in the nicest way.

In his article, he talks about taking the family to Florida, where they splurged on the simple joys of Disney World. No doubt, his kids will recall the trip one day and sigh over those halcyon times with Mickey & Co. Good old dad.

While the family was enjoying the rides and theme park-style delicacies, dad was thinking deep. No one beats Disney on branding and satisfying, quality service. They got it right from the start: founder Walt Disney was a kind-hearted visionary who knew how to give substance to dreams. How do you make customers happy, Walt wondered? By putting them at the center of the happiest of fantasies – but only after imprinting the dream on their minds as with a hot branding iron. 

There’s little room for cynicism in Disneyworld. They say the customers are king and queen, prince and princess, and they mean it. You can see it in all their interactions – they’ve systematized service and the training it requires to a point where it’s seamless – and deceptively effortless. 

Meanwhile, the customers shell out top dollar for admission. They may be all smiles, but there’s no room for shenanigans. There aren’t any: satisfaction is near universal. There’s a lesson here for running a successful advisory, particularly these days, when customers are demanding ever-more personalized service. 

Start by examining what Disney does so well: “cohesive verbal and visual messaging,” as Upton calls it. To get this right, you need to understand the core values you’re offering to clients – the reason you’re in business in the first place. With that accomplished, a clear – read accurate and original – message aimed at potential clients should begin to form.

For more information, please read:
4 Lessons From Disney on Building Your Brand | ThinkAdvisor

 

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